How to create semi-circle parliament graphs with the ggparliament package in R

Packages we will need:

library(tidyverse)
library(forcats)
library(ggparliament)

Check out part 1 of this blog where you can follow along how to scrape the data that we will use in this blog. It will create a dataset of the current MPs in the Irish Dail.

In this blog, we will use the ggparliament package, created by Zoe Meers.

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With this dataset of the 33rd Dail, we will reduce it down to get the number of seats that each party holds.

If we don’t want to graph every party, we can lump most of the smaller parties into an “other” category. We can do this with the fct_lump_n() function from the forcats package. I want the top five biggest parties only in the graph. The rest will be colored as “Other”.

Click here to read more about the forcats pacakge and dealing with factors in R.

dail_33 %>% 
  mutate(party_groups  = fct_lump_n(party, n = 5,
         other_level = "Other"))-> dail_lump_count

Next we want to count the number of members per party.

dail_lump_count %>% 
  group_by(party_groups) %>% 
  count() %>%  
  arrange(desc(n)) -> dail_count
  <fct>        <int>
1 Fianna Fail     38
2 Sinn Fein       37
3 Fine Gael       35
4 Independent     19
5 Other           19
6 Green Party     12

Before we graph, I found the hex colors that represent each of the biggest Irish political party. We can create a new party color variables with the case_when() function and add each color.

dail_count %<>% 
  mutate(party_color = case_when(party_groups == "Fianna Fail" ~ "#66bb66",
                                 party_groups == "Fine Gael" ~ "#6699ff",
                                 party_groups == "Green Party" ~ "#44532a",
                                 party_groups == "Independent" ~ "#8e2420",
                                 party_groups == "Sinn Fein" ~ "#326760",
                                 party_groups == "Other" ~ "#ee9f27"))

Now we can dive into the ggparliament package.

We use the parliamenet_data() function to create coordinates for our graph: these are the x and y variables we will plot out.

We feed in the data.frame of all the seat counts into the election_data argument.

We specifiy the type as “semi-circle“. Other options are “horseshoe” and “opposing_benches“.

We can change how many circles we want stacked on top of each other.

I tried it with three and it looked quite strange. So play around with this parl_rows argument to see what suits your data best

And last we feed in the number of seats that each party has with the n we summarised above.

dail_33_coord <- parliament_data(election_data = dail_count,
                                 type = "semicircle", 
                                 parl_rows = 6,  
                                 party_seats = dail_count$n) 

If we view the dail_33_coord data.frame we can see that the parliament_data() function calculated new x and y coordinate variables for the semi-circle graph.

I don’t know what the theta variables is for… But there it is also … maybe to make circular shapes?

We feed the x and y coordinates into the ggplot() function and then add the geom_parliament_seat() layer to produce our graph!

Click here to check out the PDF for the ggparliament package

dail_33_coord %>% 
  ggplot(aes(x = x,
             y = y,
             colour = party_groups)) +
  geom_parliament_seats(size = 20) -> dail_33_plot

And we can make it look more pretty with bbc_style() plot and colors.

Click here to read more about the BBC style graphs.

dail_33_plot +  bbplot::bbc_style() + 
  ggtitle("33rd Irish Parliament") +
  theme(text = element_text(size = 50),
                      legend.title = element_blank(),
                      axis.text.x = element_blank(),
                      axis.text.y = element_blank()) +  
  scale_colour_manual(values = dail_33_coord$party_color,
                    limits = dail_33_coord$party_groups)
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Create a dataset of Irish parliament members

library(rvest)
library(tidyverse)
library(toOrdinal)
library(magrittr)
library(genderizeR)
library(stringi)

This blogpost will walk through how to scrape and clean up data for all the members of parliament in Ireland.

Or we call them in Irish, TDs (or Teachtaí Dála) of the Dáil.

We will start by scraping the Wikipedia pages with all the tables. These tables have information about the name, party and constituency of each TD.

On Wikipedia, these datasets are on different webpages.

This is a pain.

However, we can get around this by creating a list of strings for each number in ordinal form – from1st to 33rd. (because there have been 33 Dáil sessions as of January 2023)

We don’t need to write them all out manually: “1st”, “2nd”, “3rd” … etc.

Instead, we can do this with the toOrdinal() function from the package of the same name.

dail_sessions <- sapply(1:33,toOrdinal)

Next we can feed this vector of strings with the beginning of the HTML web address for Wikipedia as a string.

We paste the HTML string and the ordinal number strings together with the stri_paste() function from the stringi package.

This iterates over the length of the dail_sessions vector (in this case a length of 33) and creates a vector of each Wikipedia page URL.

dail_wikipages <- stri_paste("https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Members_of_the_",
           dail_sessions, "_D%C3%A1il")

Now, we can take the most recent Dáil session Wikipedia page and take the fifth table on the webpage using `[[`(5)

We rename the column names with select().

And the last two mutate() lines reomve the footnote numbers in ( ) [ ] brackets from the party and name variables.

dail_wikipages[33] %>%  
  read_html() %>%
  html_table(header = TRUE, fill = TRUE) %>% 
  `[[`(5) %>% 
  rename("ble" = 1, "party" = 2, "name" = 3, "constituency" = 4) %>% 
  select(-ble) %>% 
  mutate(party = gsub(r"{\s*\([^\)]+\)}","",as.character(party))) %>% 
  mutate(name = sub("\\[.*", "", name)) -> dail_33

Last we delete the first row. That just contais a duplicate of the variable names.

dail_33 <- dail_33[-1,]

We want to delete the fadas (long accents on Irish words). We can do this across all the character variables with the across() function.

The stri_trans_general() converts all strings to LATIN ASCII, which turns string to contain only the letters in the English language alphabet.

dail_33 %<>% 
  mutate(across(where(is.character), ~ stri_trans_general(., id = "Latin-ASCII"))) 

We can also separate the first name from the second names of all the TDs and create two variables with mutate() and separate()

dail_33 %<>% 
  mutate(name = str_replace(name, "\\s", "|")) %>% 
  separate(name, into = c("first_name", "last_name"), sep = "\\|") 

With the first_name variable, we can use the new pacakge by Kalimu. This guesses the gender of the name. Later, we can track the number of women have been voted into the Dail over the years.

Of course, this will not be CLOSE to 100% correct … so later we will have to check each person manually and make sure they are accurate.

devtools::install_github("kalimu/genderizeR")

gender = findGivenNames(dail_33$name, progress = TRUE)

gender %>% 
  select(probability, gender)  -> gen_variable

gen_variable %<>% 
  select(name, gender) %>% 
  mutate(name = str_to_sentence(name))

dail_33 %<>% 
  left_join(gen_variable, by = "name") 

Create date variables and decade variables that we can play around with.

dail_df$date_2 <- as.Date(dail_df$date, "%Y-%m-%d")

dail_df$year <- format(dail_df$date_2, "%Y")

dail_df$month <- format(dail_df$date_2, "%b")

dail_df %>% 
  mutate(decade = substr(year, 1, 3)) %>% 
  mutate(decade = paste0(decade, "0s"))

In the next blog, we will graph out the various images to explore these data in more depth. For example, we can make a circle plot with the composition of the current Dail with the ggparliament package.

We can go into more depth with it in the next blog… Stay tuned.

Create density plots with ggridges package in R

Packages we will need:

library(tidyverse)
library(ggridges)
library(ggimage)  # to add png images
library(bbplot)   # for pretty graph themes

We will plot out the favourability opinion polls for the three main political parties in Ireland from 2016 to 2020. Data comes from Louwerse and Müller (2020)

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Before we dive into the ggridges plotting, we have a little data cleaning to do. First, we extract the last four “characters” from the date string to create a year variable.

I took this quick function from a StackOverflow response:

substrRight <- function(x, n){
  substr(x, nchar(x)-n+1, nchar(x))}

polls_csv$year <- substrRight(polls_csv$Date, 4)

Next, pivot the data from wide to long format.

More information of pivoting data with dplyr can be found here. I tend to check it at least once a month as the arguments refuse to stay in my head.

I only want to take the main parties in Ireland to compare in the plot.

polls <- polls_csv %>%
  select(year, FG:SF) %>% 
  pivot_longer(!year, names_to = "party", values_to = "opinion_poll")

I went online and found the logos for the three main parties (sorry, Labour) and saved them in the working directory I have for my RStudio. That way I can call the file with the prefix “~/**.png” rather than find the exact location they are saved on the computer.

polls %>% 
  filter(party == "FF" | party == "FG" | party == "SF" ) %>% 
  mutate(image = ifelse(party=="FF","~/ff.png",
 ifelse(party=="FG","~/fg.png", "~/sf.png"))) -> polls_three

Now we are ready to plot out the density plots for each party with the geom_density_ridges() function from the ggridges package.

We will add a few arguments into this function.

We add an alpha = 0.8 to make each density plot a little transparent and we can see the plots behind.

The scale = 2 argument pushes all three plots togheter so they are slightly overlapping. If scale =1, they would be totally separate and 3 would have them overlapping far more.

The rel_min_height = 0.01 argument removes the trailing tails from the plots that are under 0.01 density. This is again for aesthetics and just makes the plot look slightly less busy for relatively normally distributed densities

The geom_image takes the images and we place them at the beginning of the x axis beside the labels for each party.

Last, we use the bbplot package BBC style ggplot theme, which I really like as it makes the overall graph look streamlined with large font defaults.

polls_three %>% 
  ggplot(aes(x = opinion_poll, y = as.factor(party))) +  
  geom_density_ridges(aes(fill = party), 
                      alpha = 0.8, 
                      scale = 2,
                      rel_min_height = 0.01) + 
  ggimage::geom_image(aes(y = party, x= 1, image = image), asp = 0.9, size = 0.12) + 
  facet_wrap(~year) + 
  bbplot::bbc_style() +
  scale_fill_manual(values = c("#f2542d", "#edf6f9", "#0e9594")) +
  theme(legend.position = "none") + 
  labs(title = "Favourability Polls for the Three Main Parties in Ireland", subtitle = "Data from Irish Polling Indicator (Louwerse & Müller, 2020)")
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Make a timeline graph with dates in ggplot2

We will use the geom_segment layer from ggplot2 to make a timeline graph!

This layer takes

  • x and xend for the start of the segment lines
  • y and yend inputs for the end of the segment lines

For our timeline, the x will be the start of each Irish Taoiseach’s term.

The xend will be the end of their term, when they get kicked out of office.

Taoisigh (plural of Taoiseach) are Irish prime ministers and are in charge of the executive branch when their party is in change.

For Ireland, that means that basically every Taoiseach has been the leader of one of the two main parties – Fianna Fail or Fine Gael.

Not very exciting.

Also they have all been men.

This is also not very exciting.

We have a bit more to go with increasing the diversity in Ireland’s top job.

The y argument is the Taoiseach number in office. Although there have been fifteen men that have held the office of Taoiseach, this does not mean that they only held office for one time only.

Ireland has a parliamentary system so when a party loses an election, the former Taoiseach can become the leader of the opposition and hope in the future they can become Taoiseach again. Some men have been Taoiseach two or three times in non-consecutive terms.

When we are adding the labels with the geom_text() layer, I created an order variable which indicates the first time each man took the office of Taoiseach.

This is so I only have the name of each man only once in the graph. If we don’t do this step, if a man held office more than once, their name appears every time on the graph and the plot becomes a crowded mess.

I add the ifelse statement so that the first name appears after the segment line and therefore text does not take up too much room on the left edge of the graph.

Last we use the scale_color_manual() function with nice hex colors for each of the political parties.

time_line <- df %>% 
 ggplot(aes(x = as.Date(start), y = number, color = party_factor)) +
 geom_segment(aes(xend = as.Date(end), yend = number, color =  party_factor), size = 6) +
 geom_text(aes(label = order, hjust = ifelse(taoiseach_number < 2, -0.7, 1.1)), size = 8, show.legend = FALSE) +
 scale_color_manual(values = c("Fine Gael" = "#004266", "Fianna Fáil" = "#FCB322", "Cumann na nGaedheal" = "#D62828"))

I increase the limits of the graph to accommodate the name labels. Most of the time, these extra bits of code in ggplot2 depend on the type of data you have and what fits on the graph plane nicely!

So this stages is often only finished after trial-and-error.

I add a snazzy theme_fivethirtyeight() theme from ggthemes package.

Last, with the theme() function, we can remove most of the elements of the graph to make the graph cleaner.

time_line <- time_line + 
  expand_limits(x = as.Date("1915-01-01")) +
  theme_fivethirtyeight() +
  theme(legend.position = "top",
        legend.title = element_blank(),
        legend.direction = "vertical",
        axis.title.y = element_blank(),
        axis.text.y = element_blank(),
        text = element_text(size = 20)) +
  labs(title = "Taoiseach Terms in Ireland",
 subtitle = "From 1922 to 2021") 

We can also create the pie chart to see which party has held power longest in Ireland.

With dplyr we can subtract the start date from the end date and add all the Taoiseach durations (in days) together with the cumsum() argument.

We then choose the highest duration value for each party with the slice(which.max()) functions.

I was lazy and I just re-wrote the values in a new data.frame and called it counts.

df %>%
  group_by(party_factor) %>% 
  dplyr::summarise(max_count = cumsum(duration_number)) %>%  
  slice(which.max(max_count)) %>% 
  select(party_factor, max_count) %>% 
  arrange(desc(max_count))

counts <- data.frame(group = c("Cumann na nGaedheal", "Fine Gael" ,"Fianna Fáil"), 
                     value = c(3381, 10143, 22539))

Create proportion values for our pie-chart graph. To do this divide value by the sum of the values and multiply by 100.

data <- counts %>% 
  arrange(desc(group)) %>%
  dplyr::mutate(prop = value / sum(value) * 100) 

Change the numeric variables to factors.

data$duration <- as.factor(data$value)
data$party_factor <- as.factor(data$group)

We use the coord_polar() to create the piechart. To learn more, check out the r-graph-gallery page about creating pie-charts:

pie_chart <- ggplot(data, aes(x = ", y = prop, fill = group)) + geom_bar(stat = "identity", width = 1, color = "white") + coord_polar("y", start = 0) +

theme(legend.position = "none") + scale_fill_manual(values = c("Fine Gael" = "#004266", "Fianna Fáil" = "#FCB322", "Cumann na nGaedheal" = "#D62828")) +
 labs(title = "Which party held the office of Taoiseach longest?", subtitle = "From 1922 to 2021")

We can tidy up the plot and get rid of theme elements we don’t want with theme_void()

pie_chart <- pie_chart + theme_void() + theme(legend.title = element_blank(), legend.position = none, text = element_text(size = 40))

I want to add both graphs together so I can save the pie chart with a transparent background with the ggsave() function. I also make sure the lines are not jagged with the type = "cairo" from with Cairo package.

ggsave(pie_chart, file="pie_chart.png", type="cairo", bg = "transparent", width = 50, height = 50, units = "cm")

And we can use canva.com to add them together and create a single chart

And viola!